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By Amanda Carreiro

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Crystal Ball 2019: Video killed the television star

With 2019 ramping up, expect new trends throughout the news, social media, technology and more. At APEX and ruckus digital we will be sharing our predictions on some of these trends that we think will define 2019 (or at least part of it).

Amanda Carreiro, community manager at ruckus Digital, shares her view on what will happen to video this year.

We’ve all noticed our attention spans shrinking significantly over the last five years, and for marketers it’s become increasingly obvious. With all the information swirling around on social media feeds and news sites, consumers have adopted the feeling of needing to consume as much of it as possible (I blame the phenomenon that is FOMO). Because of this, digital content creators began producing content that sat in the ideal timeframe of 1 minute long – which was later reduced to 30 seconds, then to 10 seconds, then to just six seconds.

This is still the format adopted by most brands today. In fact, studies show that consumers register information from video content within the first second, and that the ideal spot for your brand’s messaging in a video is within the first 3 seconds.

With decreasing attention spans and the evolution of our brains taking in information faster, you may think that short form content is the only way to go, but think again – long form video content is making a comeback.

The reality is, that while consumers need a brand message served to them in 3 seconds, longer form content can grab and hold their attention just as well.

Take Vice Canada for example – as a major video content producer, they are regularly publishing social media videos that are anywhere between three to 10 minutes long; and according to Nina Sudra, General Manager of Vice Canada, it’s working for them.

Even Tasty – the food content experts who found their success online by posting quick 1-2 minute long video recipes – has now started to create longer form video content that ranges from 5-12 minutes long.

The television audience has been shrinking dramatically for years as consumers have shifted their attention to online streaming platforms. You see, when content is left to studios to create you end up with some good content, but mostly lackluster shows that you’ve never heard of because they only got one season on NBC. YouTube and Netflix have created a whole new generation of creators and viewers who know quality content and only want to be served that.

This trend, paired with the additional introductions of long form content platforms like IGTV and Facebook Watch, make it so that consumers now have more outlets to view the long form content they’re interested in.

Throughout 2019, brands will need to start changing their 6 second video strategy, to creating long form video that is relevant and interesting to their audience. They’ll need to reconsider the existing platforms and find new ways to serve their message – think a YouTube series for example.

The goal however remains the same, brands need to create engaging content, and this will be even harder now that there’s more view time to fill.

Amanda Carreiro is a community manager at ruckus digital. Check out more of our Crystal Ball series to know what other trends to expect in 2019. Need help with your video strategy? Drop us a line.

3 improv lessons that made me a better community manager

With brands like Wendy’s constantly “winning the internet” with clever social content and humourous banter with users, it’s becoming increasingly important for community managers to bring a level of wit and quick thinking to the job.

To sharpen my wit and perfect my ability to create content that resonates with target audiences, I spent 6 weeks taking improv classes, and I think anyone in the creative industry should do the same.

In case the idea of attempting to entertain a room full of strangers triggers your anxiety, here are 3 key takeaways I can share for anyone to apply to their day jobs.

  1. Let go and commit

In improv, the best performances are the ones where the actor fully goes for it. Hesitation or insecurity is obvious to the audience and can hinder the performance. As a creative thinker, when working on your next big idea, it’s best to stay away from the “but” and focus on the “yes, and” (a rule-of-thumb for improv).  When you don’t focus on potential limitations or obstacles, it’s easier to elevate your ideas.

  1. Act naturally

On the first day of class they say, “don’t try to be funny.” It may sound counterproductive, but it makes a lot of sense. It’s a lesson in being natural. Consumers can often tell when a brand is trying too hard to be “relevant”; the best content fits naturally into a brand’s voice.

  1. On the other side of panic is somewhere you really want to be

Just like improv, the creative industry is a fast-paced, ever-changing environment that can get overwhelming. Feelings of panic can impact the way you perform – but if you can ride the waves, push through the panic, and give your best effort without fear, the outcome is worth a standing ovation.

 

Amanda Carreiro is a community manager at ruckus Digital. Need help with your social media approach? Drop us a line.